Perris City Council places moratorium on mobile home rent increases  Nov 13, 2007

The Perris City Council placed a 45 day moratorium on all rent increases. Concerns from several residents prompted the action by council members. “Our hands are tied,” said Councilman Al Landers. “We’ve got to do something to help you folks.” John Fatone, chairman of Park Place Manufactured Homes Community Group, said he was pleased with the council’s decision. “It’s protection for   seniors,” Fatone said before the meeting. In February, Fatone along with residents from two mobile-home parks, Lake Perris Village on San Jacinto Boulevard and Park Place on Dawes Street, raised concerns with rapid rent increases over several months. Fatone said the residents are paying about $490 a month, $100 more than several months prior. Mayor Daryl Busch and other council members supported the ordinance in order to assist the council when deciding whether to adopt a rent control ordinance later. “That’s what the moratorium is for, to get the facts,” he said at the meeting. Councilman John Motte opposed the ordinance, saying that it would open the city to legal issues. He called the action anti-American and anti-property rights.

Evictions Halted as Santa Monica Launches into Trailer Park Development Agreement

Many residents said previous property owners and managers have deliberately run down the trailer park and not allowed residents to sell or upgrade their trailers because redevelopment ideas have been in mind for years.

“I own and have invested financially in my trailer, which is what they are trying to take away,” said Jack Waddington, who has lived in Village Trailer Park for nine years.

“I prefer trailer park living, which I have been   doing for 20 years,” Waddington said. “It is my own space with a patio, foliage and no shared walls. There is a strong sense of community that can never be found living in housing complexes.”

which is what they are trying to take away,” said Jack Waddington, who has lived in Village Trailer Park for nine years.

“I prefer trailer park living, which I have been   doing for 20 years,” Waddington said. “It is my own space with a patio, foliage and no shared walls. There is a strong sense of community that can never be found living in housing complexes.”

San Marcos Park Owner Wants Rent Increase

After more than three hours of testimony from residents, experts retained by the city, and experts and attorneys retained by park owner Carolyn Artis, the meeting will continue Jan. 8. Residents of the 85-space park’s 32 lowest-rent spaces received a notice this summer from management company Cal-Am that their rents would be raised to $650 per month. For some renters, the increase was as little as $12 a month. For others, it was closer to $300 a month.”You bought a park with some of the highest rents in San Marcos … and you’re here a year later asking for a couple of hundred dollars more (per month),” Commissioner Mike Preston told one expert, Norton Karno, who advised Artis to buy Villa Vista. “Was that a good business decision or not?”

Board to Weigh Home Conversion Rules

 The need for new regulations on conversions and closures of mobile home parks will be debated Tuesday by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors.On the issue of mobile home park conversions, subdivisions and closures, the board is considering whether new county regulations are needed because such changes are allowed under existing state laws. In May, the supervisors unanimously backed two bills aimed at rewriting state Government Code sections that currently enable park owners to avoid local rent-control ordinances by subdividing a park and selling off one or more spaces.                                                .

One of those bills, AB 1542, was passed by the Legislature but then vetoed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, according to a report from the county planning staff. The other bill, SB 900, is still active but not yet law.  Currently, there are 15 mobile home parks in the unincorporated areas of Santa Barbara County and only one, in Orcutt, where residents own rather than rent the spaces beneath their coaches, the staff report says. The county regulates how much park owners can      increase space rents annually, but its ordinances are silent on conversions, subdivisions or closures of parks, relying instead on state law.

San Luis Obispo county supervisors voted in    February to place a temporary moratorium on   converting mobile home parks there to other uses. In July, the city of Goleta also placed an “urgency ban” on conversion of parks to resident ownership until the effects of SB 900 and AB 1542 are better known.

Purchase of Windsor Park by ROP, Inc.

The pending sale of Windsor’s largest mobile home park is causing anxiety among its senior residents who fear they can’t afford the rent increases planned by the buyer.

The purchase of the Windsor Mobile Country Club by a nonprofit housing corporation is billed as a way to keep rents affordable. But rents in the 336-space park could jump significantly at first — 50 to 65 percent in some cases — in order for the buyer, Resident Owned Parks of Sacramento, to swing the deal.

“Selling this place has really put us all in a tizzy,” said June Moss, an 83-year-old widow. “God knows how high our rent is going to be.”

Her income, like that of many residents, comes from Social Security. She pays slightly more than $300 a month but could face an increase to $500 under the preliminary projections of the new    buyers. (full article in Supplement – email only)